M.O.T.s

Class 4 & 7

 

We offer Class 4 and 7 MOT's

 

Class 4 MOT - Start from £45.00

  • Class IV — Cars, including 3-wheeled vehicles more than 450 kg unladen weight, taxis, minibuses and ambulances up to 12 passenger seats, Goods Vehicles not exceeding 3,000 kg Design Gross Weight (DGW), motor caravans and Dual Purpose Vehicles.

Class 7 MOT - Start from £55.00

  • Class VII — Goods vehicles over 3,000 kg up to and including 3,500 kg DGW. If a vehicle is presented with a manufacturer’s plate and a 'Ministry plate' the weights to be used are those on the 'Ministry plate'.

 

Our MOTs are by appointment only for a drop off service, unfortunately we cannot offer a while you wait service at present.

 

In the event of your vehicle failing its MOT test it may require additional repair work. We will quote you accordingly and if carried out with us you will benefit from no re-test fee. If your vehicle leaves our centre to be repaired elsewhere, then a partial re-test fee will apply. Slough Auto Centre guarantees our work to VOSA standards.

 

To book your car in for an MOT call us today on: 01753 523 345.

 

 

Rules and regulations for an MOT in the United Kingdom

The actual designation for the pass certificate is VT20, and failure is the VT30, with any advisories being the VT32. The "MOT" Test will provide an emissions report if applicable.

It is illegal to drive a non-exempt vehicle that requires a test on public roads without a current MOT,[10] except when driving to or from (subject to insurance terms and conditions) a booked MOT Test or to have remedial work done to rectify failures in a previous test.[11] Possession of an up-to-date VT20 test certificate is a pre-requisite for obtaining a tax disc, and advertisements for used cars frequently say how many months are left to run on the current MOT (i.e., VT20 certificate; although the VT20 points out that it does not, in any way, guarantee road-worthiness at the time of sale). A vehicle could suffer major damage after an MOT has been carried out, but the certificate would still be valid, and obtaining a new one is not required by law (some insurance companies may require a new test, but this is their practice, not law). However, driving a vehicle which is in a dangerous condition on a public road is always illegal, irrespective of its test status.

 

Overview of the MOT test

In Great Britain MOT testing centres are regulated and licensed by the Department and Transport and DVSA for the purpose, and the individual testers carrying out the inspections also have to be trained and certified. The decision to pass or fail each presented vehicle comes down to the discretion of the tester following the guidelines issued by the DVSA.

The MOT test covers the following aspects:

  • Lighting and signalling equipment
  • Steering (including suspension)
  • Brakes
  • Tyres and wheels
  • Seat belts
  • Body, structure and general items. Includes body and components such as spoilers, bumpers and mirror housings.
  • Exhaust, fuel and emissions
  • Driver's view of the road

 

An MOT test certificate confirms that at the time of test, the vehicle has met the minimum acceptable environmental and road safety standards. It does not mean that the vehicle is roadworthy for the life of the certificate. The test does not cover the condition of the engine, clutch or gearbox. Maintenance that is necessary for the reliable and efficient operation of the vehicle but not its safety forms part of a service inspection that is recommended by manufacturers, but is not a legal requirement for operating the vehicle on the public highway.

Items such as the windscreen, wipers and exhaust systems are tested for condition and operation. Windscreen wipers will fail the test if they do not adequately clear the windscreen when used in conjunction with the washers. The exhaust system, in addition to checks on its condition and security, is tested to ascertain whether it is obviously louder than another vehicle of the same make and model with a standard exhaust system fitted. Dismantling of any part of the vehicle during the MOT test is strictly against test regulations, making the assessment of corrosion or worn components in certain areas on certain car models very difficult to determine accurately. As the MOT is only an inspection for road-worthiness at the time of test, the inspection of most accessories is not included. One exception is tow bars: their condition and their attachment to the vehicle is now included in the MOT.

Re-tests

When a vehicle fails the MOT test it can be re-tested within the end of 10 working days to gain a pass. There may be a charge payable. If the vehicle remains at the test station for repair after failure then it can have a free partial re-test within 10 working days after the original test has been carried out. If it is removed from the premises for repair and then returned before the end of 10 working days it can have a retest at half the original fee paid. If the failed vehicle is taken away but then brought back to the same test station and retested before the end of the next working day on one or more of the following items only then no fee is charged for a retest:

Bonnet, horn, sharp edges, boot lid, lamps, steering wheel, brake pedal anti-slip, loading door, tailboard, direction indicators, mirrors, tailgate, doors rear reflectors, VIN, drop sides, registration plates, windscreen and glass, fuel filler cap, seat belts, wipers and washers, hazard warning, seats, wheels and tyres.

After the 10-day period a full MOT test will have to be carried out. The full MOT test fee is charged again.

Test stations and the DVSA's website provide full and up-to-date information regarding MOT re-tests.

The fee for testing and retesting is at the discretion of the proprietor of the test facility, subject to legal maximum prices. The vehicle owner is only subject to one retest per MOT test. If the vehicle fails the MOT retest it is then subject to a full MOT test at the full MOT test fee.

 

Changes in 2012

In 2012 the MOT test was radically overhauled with many items not previously included in the test now becoming standard.[16]

It also saw the introduction in Great Britain of 'receipt style' plain paper certificates that serve as a notification that a 'pass' entry has been recorded on the DVSA database. The MOT test number contained on the certificate gives access to the vehicle's current test status as well as its test history from 2005 onwards, via the DVSA web site. MOT certificates in Northern Ireland continue to be issued on paper, accompanied by a paper 'certificate disc' which must be displayed on the vehicle. Display of these discs has been mandatory on Northern Ireland tested cars since 2008.

From 18 November, the MOT[17] certificate shows the vehicle's recent mileage history. This has been introduced as part of a government initiative to reduce vehicle crime. Where available, the mileage history will comprise the readings associated with the three most recent VT20s (test passes) along with the date of those readings.

 

 

 

 

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